The Rhodia Journal Swap

“The problems of the world cannot possibly be solved by skeptics or cynics whose horizons are limited by the obvious realities. We need men who can dream of things that never were.”
John Keats

Working on one page, it is difficult to comprehend that each page is part of a continuum. We are slowly but surely learning to draw better lines. We can't see the bigger picture. Pun intended.

doodle boxes, gelly rolls & microns

doodle boxes, gelly rolls & microns

Twenty-six (26) things you can do in your journal. Rhodia dot webbie journal, black gelly roll pen.

Twenty-six (26) things you can do in your journal. Rhodia dot webbie journal, black gelly roll pen.

title page hand-lettering, Rhodia dot webbie journal, black gelly roll

title page hand-lettering, Rhodia dot webbie journal, black gelly roll

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2012 Rhodia Journal Swap, Daisy Yellow

In 2012 I was one of the participating artists in the Rhodia Journal Swap! It took over a year for twelve artists to fill twelve journals. We tracked our collective progress on a {now defunct} collaborative Tumblr account where we uploaded our pages as a form of documentation. At the outset, the folks at Rhodia sent a 6x9" Rhodia Dot Webbie journals to each of the participating artists.

We were to complete 6 pages over the course of a month and then mail the journal to the next person on the list. We then received, in theory, a journal from the person before us on the list. And then worked another 6 pages. There were no rules whatsoever regarding content. Some folks wrote diary-like entries. Others drew elaborate doodle designs. Some folks dropped out, some journals were lost and then found. It gets fairly intense to receive an orange journal each month and know that you need to fill six pages with something interesting, and overall it was a positive experience even with the ups & downs.

The Rhodia Dot Webbie has deliciously smooth drawing paper. The grid of dots appeals to my analytical side and I loved using them as lines and as a grid and to measure spacing for doodle patterns. Sometimes I just ignored the dots, like ignoring lines on index cards.