Draw Your Words: Variations Galore

Invent - develop- imagine. Select about 5 letters of the alphabet to explore in detail. For each letter, devise at least 25 different variations. Try to do this with just your mind and perhaps the objects in the room around you. The THINKING about letters is part of the process.

Pen notes: The pen that I use in the video, the orange pen, is a Stabilo Worker with a medium nib. These pens have a metal tip which I assume is a rollerball, and the ink flows really smoothly so that you can draw really dark black designs. The examples in green were drawn with a Hi-Tec C pen with .3 nib. I got mine at Jet Pens in a set of 10. These pens have gel ink and a metal tip and some people find them scratchy in this nib size. I think they are just fabulous for drawing teeny tiny details. A really fabulous pen for brainstorming letters is a "classic" Sakura Gelly Roll whose nib is smaller than the Stabilo and much larger than the Hi-Tec.They are extremely reliable all-around wonderful pens that I always have in my purse and take on vacation.

This is a good idea for those little pockets of time that we have each day. Waiting for a conference call to start, in a waiting room, while the baby is napping, for the pasta to cook, or while talking on the phone. I used to draw while sitting on these uncomfortable metal benches at the aquatic center while my daughters took swimming lessons. And I still draw in the car while sitting in the carpool line. I drew in the pre-op room before my recent foot surgery. Soon it will get to be a little game. How much time can you find in your day to squeeze in some drawing time? Just 15-20 minutes each day adds up to meaningful progress in your lettering and drawing skills. You may not see a difference over the course of a week, but you will definitely see the difference over the course of several months. You won't even know that you are making progress until you look back at  your earlier work. So keep these pages to help you visualize your progress. 

Try writing as many variations as you can fit on an index card or page in your journal!  You might draw a letter on the top of each page and then as you think of variations, fill in the pages. It might take a week! 

Creative Insight of the Day: 

In Poets & Writers, James Tadd Adcox, author of Does Not Love, states, “I will try anything to break through my own perfectionism and dull literal-mindedness, my need to explain everything, my need to defend. I can be a very slow writer, prone to fidgetiness and second-guesses. What I’ve found helpful recently is to give myself the writing equivalent of stress tests. I’ve never done NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month), but two summers ago I attempted to write a novel in a week, aiming for 50,000 words and managing 35,000.”

Go to the DYW Index to navigate to each section.