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    « Miniaturas | Main | Elemental Grid »
    Saturday
    Oct112008

    The Hundred Languages of Children

    The Hundred Languages of Children

    No way. The hundred is there.
    The child
    is made of one hundred.
    The child has
    a hundred languages
    a hundred hands
    a hundred thoughts
    a hundred ways of thinking
    of playing, of speaking.
    A hundred always a hundred
    ways of listening
    of marveling of loving
    a hundred joys
    for singing and understanding
    a hundred worlds
    to discover
    a hundred worlds
    to invent
    a hundred worlds
    to dream.
    The child has
    a hundred languages
    (and a hundred hundred hundred more)
    but they steal ninety-nine.
    The school and the culture
    separate the head from the body.
    They tell the child:
    to think without hands
    to do without head
    to listen and not to speak
    to understand without joy
    to love and to marvel
    only at Easter and at Christmas.
    They tell the child:
    to discover the world already there
    and of the hundred
    they steal ninety-nine.
    They tell the child:
    that work and play
    reality and fantasy
    science and imagination
    sky and earth
    reason and dream
    are things
    that do not belong together.
    And thus they tell the child
    that the hundred is not there.
    The child says:
    No way. The hundred is there.

    Loris Malaguzzi (translated by Lella Gandini)

    The Hundred Languages of Children, An Exhibit by the Municipal Infant-Toddler Centers and Preschools of Reggio Emilia, Italy. Learn more about the Reggio Emilia approach.

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